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Ordnance Division
(Page 1 - Doctrinal & General Information)

Looking for more information from military/civilian personnel assigned to or associated with the U.S. Army in Germany from 1945 to 1989. If you have any stories or thoughts on the subject, please contact me.


The 1940s

The 1950s
Tel Dir, Ord Division
Ord Stock Control
Class II & IV Ord Units
Class V Ord Units
Ord Rebuild Program
Ord Service Centers
7th Army MASS

Ord Construction

The 1960s
Class II & IV Ord Units
Class V Ord Units
Special Weapons
COSTAR Ord Units
Cellular Ord Units
Equip Maint Centers

The 1970s

The 1980s


 
The 1950s
 

Big Picture Series: Ordnance Corps in USAREUR, mid-1950s (YouTube)
 
Ordnance - Maintenance & General Supply
 
(Source: FM 9-10, Ordnance Maintenance and General Supply in the Field, August 1951)

Figure 1: Field Army Level Ordnance Support (1951)

Figure 2: 7th Army Ordnance Organization (Draft)
Ordnance Command Units in the Combat Zone

General

a. The contact of ordnance service with the using organization is extremely important and provisions have been made to simplify that contact to a single point for ammunition and another point for both maintenance and supply. A mobile ordnance maintenance unit is organic to each division and provides direct support for the maintenance and supply requirements of all units of the division. Battalion headquarters and attached mobile ordnance maintenance companies of army ordnance service provide a direct support for the maintenance and supply requirements of non-divisional units in the combat zone. Divisional ordnance maintenance units and the battalions of army ordnance service charged with providing direct support of using organizations are referred to as direct support ordnance units.

b. The direct support ordnance units are supported by semimobile heavy maintenance companies and depot companies. The heavy maintenance companies accept overflow work from direct support units and accomplish work requiring more extensive shop equipment. The depot companies provide a reserve of ordnance general supply, especially fast moving parts and heavy assemblies. Ordnance battalions consisting of heavy maintenance companies and depot companies are referred to as heavy support battalions.

c. Each using organization, whether it be division or nondivisional receives direct support from a single ordnance company. Each direct support ordnance unit is supported by a heavy support ordnance battalion.

d. Further to the rear, additional ordnance battalions are organized for specific general support missions, such as operation of the Army Ordnance Supply Depot, the Army Artillery and Vehicle Park, the Army Ordnance Rehabilitation Point, and the Army Ordnance Collecting Point.

e. Ordnance service in the field army is normally organized in four ordnance groups (Figure 1). For discussion purposes these groups are designated the first, second, third and fourth ordnance groups. The first ordnance group is concerned with the supply of ammunition and is discussed in in a separate section. The second, third and fourth ordnance groups are concerned with ordnance maintenance and general supply and are covered in this section.

Second Ordnance Group
The group is responsible for providing direct support for corps troops and for assisiting the ordnance maintenance companies of the infantry and airborne divisions.

  One forward direct support battalion is assigned the mission of providing direct support for each corps. The Ord Bn (Fwd)(DS) consists of one headquarters and headquarters detachment; four medium maintenance companies; one medium automotive maintenance company; and one recovery company.

One forward heavy support battalion supports each forward direct support battalion. The Ord Bn (Hv Spt) consists of one headquarters and headquarters detachment; two heavy maintenance companies; two heavy automotive maintenance company; two depot companies; and one reclamation and classification company.
 
Third Ordnance Group
This group is responsible for the field maintenance of units located in or passing through the army service area and for the field maintenance of army aircraft.
  Two army service direct support battalions provide direct support for army troops. Each battalion consists of one headquarters and headquarters detachment, ordnance battalion; five medium automotive maintenance companies; and one medium maintenance company. The entire army service area is divided between these two direct support ordnance battalions.

One army service heavy support battalion supports the two army service direct support battalions. This battalion consists of one headquarters and headquarters detachment, ordnance battalion; four heavy automotive maintenance companies; and two depot companies.

Four light aircraft maintenance companies and one headquarters and headquarters detachment, ordnance battalion are required for the inspection of organizational maintenance of army aviation, the replenishment of army aviation spare parts and supplies consumed in organizational and field maintenance, and the field maintenance of army aircraft. One light aircraft maintenance company is located near each corps air-strip and at the army air-strip. The difference is that army aviation inspection procedures and maintenance cycles precludes any mixing of army aviation technical skills with armament or vehicles maintenance personnel and a distinct organizational structure is preserved.
 
Fourth Ordnance Group
This group provides general support for the field army.
  The army ordnance supply depot consists of one headquarters and headquarters detachment, ordnance battalion, and four ordnance depot companies. This battalion is the port of entry for ordnance general supplies, except for towed artillery vehicles and army aircraft.

The army ordnance artillery and vehicle park consists of one headquarters and headquarters detachment, ordnance battalion, one artillery and vehicle park company, one medium maintenance company, and one medium automotive maintenance company. This battalion is responsible for the receipt, inspection, and servicing of towed artillery and vehicles required by the army for replacement purposes.

The army ordnance rehabilitation point consists of one headquarters and headquarters detachment, ordnance battalion, two medium maintenance companies; and two medium automotive maintenance companies. This battalion rehabilitates the ordnance equipment of organizations withdrawn from combat for this purpose and may be dispatched to any part of the army area where its services are required.

The army ordnance collecting point consists of two battalions of heavy maintenance companies to inspect, classify, repair, or reclaim unserviceable ordnance major items, assemblies, subassemblies, and parts, as well as captured enemy mat6riel of similar types generated in the combat zone. Two headquarters and headquarters detachments, ordnance battalion; three heavy maintenance companies; three heavy automotive maintenance companies; one reclamation and classification company; and one recovery company constitute two army heavy maintenance battalions for this purpose.
 
7th Army Ord Bns in USAREUR (STATION LIST, 15 Dec 1952):
Fwd DS Ordnance Battalions -
71st Ord Bn, Illesheim
80th Ord Bn, Esslingen
85th Ord Bn, Oberursel
Fwd Hv Spt Ordnance Battalions -
8th Ord Bn, Griesheim
38th Ord Bn, Nellingen
7th Army Ordnance Supply Depot -
19th Ord Bn, Böblingen

(Webmaster Note: the 38th Ord Bn was redesignated as the 87th Ord Bn in December 1954, and I believe the 80th Ord Bn was replaced in the mid-1950s by the 66th Ord Bn as part of Operation Gyroscope)

 
Ordnance Medium Maintenance Company (T/O&E 9-7)

a. Mission.
The ordnance medium maintenance company provides direct support for combat units in the combat zone, and may be employed on any of the following missions:
(1) To augment the organic divisional ordnance service of infantry divisions and of airborne divisions.
(2) To provide direct support for corps troops.
(3) To provide direct support for army heavy artillery, including heavy antiaircraft artillery.
(4) To rehabilitate the ordnance equipment of combat units, withdrawn from combat for short periods, for rest.
(5) To perform maintenance-in-storage of the army utility stock of towed artillery and vehicles, held for replacement purposes.

b. Assignment.
Ordnance medium maintenance companies are attached to ordnance battalion headquarters on the basis of the density of ordnance equipment encountered in various parts of the combat zone.

c. Capabilities.
The ordnance medium maintenance company is a mobile ordnance maintenance company capable of accomplishing the third echelon of maintenance on all types of ordnance equipment, except army aircraft, found in the combat zone, and capable of supplying the needs of supported using organizations for organizational spare parts. Under normal conditions it is capable of providing direct support for the equivalent of 100 artillery pieces, 100 tanks, and 750-wheel vehicles; with other equipment such as small arms, optical instruments, electrical fire control systems, and trailers in the proportions normally experienced in the combat zone.

d. Organization.
The ordnance medium maintenance company includes a supply section, a service section, and a recovery section, organized into one platoon; an automotive platoon, and an armament platoon. A signal corps radio repair detachment may be attached to this company when the amount of radio equipment to be repaired incident to field maintenance justifies such an arrangement.

 
Ordnance Medium Automotive Maintenance Company (T/O&E 9-127)

a. Mission.
The mission of the ordnance medium automotive maintenance company is to provide direct support to service units and combat support units in the combat zone, and may be employed in any one of the following missions:
(1) To provide direct support for corps service troops.
(2) To provide direct support for army service troops.
(3) To rehabilitate the ordnance equipment of service troops during rest periods.
(4) To combat load and to perform maintenance-in-storage of the army utility stock of general purpose vehicles, held for replacement purposes.

b. Assignment.
Ordnance medium automotive maintenance companies are attached to ordnance battalion headquarters on the basis of the density of wheel vehicles encountered in various parts of the combat zone.

c. Capabilities.
The ordnance medium automotive maintenance company is a mobile ordnance maintenance company capable of accomplishing the third echelon of maintenance on wheel vehicles and small arms of service units and combat support units in the combat zone, and capable of supplying the needs of supported using organizations for organizational spare parts. Under normal conditions, it is capable of providing direct support for the equivalent of 1,500 wheel vehicles, and the small arms normally encountered in service units and combat support units of the combat zone. In assessing the capabilities of the medium automotive maintenance company, the trucks of engineer dump truck companies and transportation corps truck companies are considered as requiring twice the field maintenance work normally required by vehicles of that weight classification in other units.

d. Organization.
The ordnance medium automotive maintenance company consists of a company headquarters, a supply section, a service section, and a small arms section, organized into one platoon; and two identical automotive maintenance platoons.

 
Ordnance Heavy Maintenance Company (Army) (T/O&E 9-9)

a. Mission.
The ordnance heavy maintenance company (army) reinforces and assists the divisional ordnance units and ordnance medium maintenance companies by accepting work beyond these units' capabilities, either because of the extent of the work required, or due to lack of time, manpower, or space or because of the tactical situation. This company performs field maintenance on small arms, artillery, instruments, and tracked or combat vehicles.

b. Assignment.
Ordnance heavy maintenance companies are attached to ordnance battalion headquarters on the basis of the density of ordnance equipment encountered in various parts of the combat zone.

c. Capabilities.
The ordnance heavy maintenance company is a semi-mobile ordnance maintenance company capable of accomplishing the third and fourth echelons of maintenance on all types of ordnance equipment, except army aircraft and wheel vehicles, found in the combat zone. Under normal conditions, one heavy maintenance company can provide heavy support for one armored division; three infantry divisions; or the corps troops of one corps. The tank platoon of the ordnance heavy maintenance company is designed to work on track vehicles. The individual repairmen, however, are all qualified in the maintenance of wheel vehicles before they specialize in track vehicles. If provision is made for the supply of assemblies
and parts for wheel vehicles, the ordnance heavy maintenance company can be employed in the field maintenance of wheel vehicles. The ordnance heavy maintenance company may also be employed in the depot maintenance of all types of ordnance equipment, except army aircraft, in a theater where depot maintenance battalions are not provided. This employment is advantageous when fixed shop buildings are not available and new construction is impractical, such as during the early stages of an operation or in a theater where a fixed depot system will not be established. Employment of ordnance maintenance companies in lieu of depot maintenance battalions will necessitate the issue of some depot maintenance tools and the supply of parts required for the fifth echelon of maintenance. The arrangement for the supply of additional tools and parts to enable the ordnance heavy maintenance company to engage in the fifth echelon of maintenance is an operational project which requires approval by the Theater Army Ordnance Officer.

d. Organization.
The ordnance heavy maintenance company consists of a supply section and a service section organized into one platoon; an armament platoon; and a tank platoon.
 
Ord HM units in USAREUR (STATION LIST, 15 Dec 1952):
88th Ord Co (HM)(Army), Sandhofen
301st
Ord Co (HM)(Army), Illesheim
304th Ord Co (HM)
(Army), Hanau
357th Ord Co (HM)(Army), 38th Ord Bn, Nellingen
517th Ord Co (HM)(Army), Karlsruhe

 
Ordnance Heavy Automotive Maintenance Company (T/O&E 9-197)

a. Mission.
The ordnance heavy automotive maintenance company accomplishes field maintenance of wheel vehicles and trailers, when the scope of maintenance work required is beyond the capabilities of direct support ordnance maintenance units in the combat zone.

b. Assignment.
Ordnance heavy automotive maintenance companies are attached to ordnance battalion headquarters on the basis of the density of ordnance equipment encountered in various parts of the combat zone.

c. Capabilities.
The ordnance heavy automotive maintenance company is a semi-mobile ordnance maintenance company capable of accomplishing the third and fourth echelons of maintenance on wheel vehicles. Under normal conditions, one heavy automotive maintenance company can provide heavy support for a combat force in an area containing 4,500 wheel vehicles, exclusive of trailers. The ordnance heavy automotive maintenance company may also be employed in the depot maintenance of wheel vehicles in a theater where depot maintenance battalions are not provided. This employment is advantageous when fixed shop buildings are not available and new construction is impractical, such as during the early stages of an operation or in a theater where a fixed depot system will not be established. Employment of ordnance heavy automotive maintenance companies in lieu of depot maintenance battalions will necessitate
the issue of some depot maintenance tools and the supply of parts required for the fifth echelon of maintenance. The arrangement for the supply of additional tools and parts to enable the ordnance heavy automotive maintenance company to engage in the fifth echelon of maintenance is an operational project which requires approval by the Theater Army Ordnance Officer.

d. Organization.
The ordnance heavy automotive maintenance company consists of a company headquarters; a service section and a supply section organized into one platoon; amd an automotive platoon.
 
Ord HAM units in USAREUR (STATION LIST, 15 Dec 1952):
504th Ord Co (HAM), 38th Ord Bn, Nellingen
507th Ord Co (HAM), 8th Ord Bn, Griesheim Ordnance Depot
519th Ord Co (HAM), Kaiserslautern
881st Ord Co (HAM)
, 8th Ord Bn, Hanau
903rd Ord Co (HAM), 38th Ord Bn, Nellingen

 
Ordnance Depot Company (T/O&E 9-57)

a. Mission.
The ordnance depot company (Army) receives, stores, and issues Class II and IV ordnance general supplies and equipment, except towed artillery and vehicles, used by an army in the field.

b. Assignment.
Ordnance depot companies (army) are attached to ordnance battalion headquarters on the basis of the density of troops to be supplied and type of major items of equipment to be serviced.

c. Capabilities.
The ordnance depot company (army) is a semi-mobile unit which can lift approximately 170 tons of ordnance general supplies per day in the semi-trailer vans and cargo trucks authorized the company. While it can lift this tonnage, it cannot displace in one serial because of the limited number of truck-tractors provided.

d. Organization.
The ordnance depot company consists of one depot platoon and one storage platoon.

e. 0perations.
  (1) Ordnance depot companies (army) are normally grouped into two echelons in the combat zone. The rear echelon may consist of several ordnance depot companies attached to an ordnance battalion headquarters (Webmaster Note: in Germany, the 19th Ord Bn) and assigned the mission of operating the army ordnance general supply depot (Webmaster Note: Böblingen Ordnance Depot). This depot serves as a single port of entry for all ordnance general supplies (except towed artillery and vehicles) received by the army. Normally, ordnance depot companies assigned to this depot will be given responsibility for one or more commodity groups. When four ordnance depot companies are employed on this mission commodity groups may be assigned as follows:
(a) Ordnance SNL Groups A, B, C, D and F.
(b) Ordnance SNL Group G-2 to 500, Inclusive (except G-27).
(c) Ordnance SNL Group G-501, etc.
(d) Ordnance SNL Groups G-27, H, J, K, L and miscellaneous.
  (2) The forward echelon of ordnance depot companies (Webmaster Note: in Germany, the three forward echelon depot companies - 33rd, 77th and 354th - were attached to the forward direct support ordnance battalions) are those companies attached to the forward heavy support battalions. These ordnance depot companies replenish ordnance general supplies (except towed artillery and vehicles) consumed by the division ordnance maintenance units and the army ordnance maintenance companies. Normally, two ordnance depot companies will be located in close proximity to each other to support a single corps. Assignment of missions along the lines of commodity groups is not advisable for forward echelon depot companies because of the probability of transfers of these companies between armies. However, if a number of armored divisions are grouped for an operation of considerable magnitude, it may be desirable to require one or more ordnance depot companies to stock parts pertaining to the type of ordnance equipment involved to insure a highly specialized supply service for the operation.
  (3) Ordnance depot companies must retain their identity as separate companies, so they can be transferred between battalions and armies as required. Normally, stock record cards are kept on the van with the supplies to which they pertain and stock records clerks are detailed to storage groups as required. There are three practical reasons for this:
 
(a) Storage group chiefs become thoroughly familiar with all aspects of supply pertaining to their group. A degree of specialization is attained which facilitates interchangeability and improvision.
(b) The risk of neutralizing the ordnance depot company through the loss of all the stock record cards as a result of enemy action is minimized. The loss of a part of the ordnance depot company will not jeopardize the operation of the entire company.
(c) The necessity for maintaining both stock record cards and locator cards is eliminated, thereby reducing an additional possibility for error between stock record cards and the stock actually on hand.
  (4) If centralized operation of the stock records sections of the depot companies is desired, the stock records sections may be assembled under the supervision of the battalion ordnance general supply officer, but should retain their identity as separate working sections. If it is deemed essential to assemble stock records cards in a central location, then locator cards must be prepared and held in each storage section by storage group chiefs.
  (5) The depot company, if fully supplied with all authorized supply, may have from 200 to 600 tons of ordnance general supplies in its custody. Operating procedures must provide for fast-moving essential supplies to be loaded in vans and for pooling available truck-tractors of other units to make it possible to go out of action late one day, displace during the night, organize new position, and be ready for operations early the next day. Supplies are brought up as rapidly as possible, utilizing pooled transportation of other units, especially ordnance recovery companies and army transportation corps truck companies.
  (6) The ordnance depot company will have in its custody a large stock of sensitive major items such as small arms, binoculars, and watches. Exceptional care must be exercised in the custody, security, and accounting for these items. A separate storage group, under a specially selected storage group chief is frequently desirable.
 
Ord Depot units in USAREUR (STATION LIST, 15 Dec 1952):
33rd Ord Co (Depot)(Army), 85th Ord Bn, Oberursel
40th Ord Co (Depot)(Army), 19th Ord Bn, Böblingen
63rd Ord Co
(Depot)(Army), 19th Ord Bn, Böblingen
77th Ord Co (Depot)(Army), 80th Ord Bn, Esslingen
78th Ord Co (Depot)(Army), 19th Ord Bn, Böblingen
334th Ord Co (Depot)(Army), 71st Ord Bn, Illesheim
978th Ord Co (Depot)(Army), 19th Ord Bn, Böblingen

 
Ordnance Recovery Company (T/O&E 9-187)

a. Mission.
The ordnance recovery company augments the evacuation facilities of combat units and combat support units in the combat zone. The company operates a pool of recovery equipment to provide for battlefield recovery and evacuation of ordnance equipment.

b. Assignment.
Ordnance recovery companies are attached to ordnance battalion headquarters on the basis of the number of ordnance collecting points to be established.

c. Capabilities.
The ordnance recovery company is a mobile unit capable of providing recovery and evacuation facilities for an ordnance collecting point, which is located near the corps rear boundary or in the army service area.

d. Organization.
The ordnance recovery company consists of a company headquarters and three identical recovery platoons.
  (1) The company headquarters consists of the headquarters, an operations and reconnaissance section, and a service section. The operations and reconnaissance section include the operations, reconnaissance, clerical, and communications personnel necessary to locate, inspect, and record disabled and abandoned ordnance equipment and captured enemy equipment. This section furnishes information to the headquarters section or recovery platoons to enable appropriate recovery equipment to be dispatched. Radios are mounted on light trucks to provide reconnaissance parties with communication with the recovery platoons when telephone communication is not available. The service section includes the dispatcher, organizational mechanics, welder; and armorer necessary to dispatch vehicles and perform organizational maintenance on the company vehicles and armament.
  (2) Recovery platoon. Each of the three recovery platoons is capable of functioning separately for a limited period of time when augmented by food service and administrative personnel from the company headquarters section. An explosive ordnance disposal specialist is included in each recovery platoon for the purpose of neutralizng booby traps or mines that might be encountered in recovery operations. A tank recovery vehicle and several semitrailer transporters, truck tractors, wreckers, cargo trucks, light trucks, and trailers are provided in each recovery platoon for transporting special tools and equipment, supplies, personnel, and unserviceable ordnance equipment recovered or evacuated by the platoon. Radios are provided in light trucks to provide reconnaissance parties with means of communication when telephone communication is not available.
 
e. Operations.
  (1) Using organizations have primary responsibility for the recovery and evacuation of unserviceable or abandoned ordnance equipment. The ordnance recovery company assists the using organization by performing recovery and evacuation operations beyond the capabilities of the using organization. The ordnance company should not be required, or permitted, to assume the responsibility of the using organization for this function. Requests for assistance in battlefield recovery are made by the using organization to the ordnance maintenance company charged with direct support. Such requests are either passed on to battalion headquarters or directly to the recovery company.
  (2) The ordnance recovery company performs organizational maintenance of its own equipment. Field maintenance support will normally be furnished by an ordnance medium maintenance company attached to the same battalion.
  (3) Each recovery platoon will be prepared to operate separately and to accomplish its own reconnaissance. Operating procedures will provide for the security and defensive measures will be taken by recovery crews when operations must be conducted under fire.
  (4) Recovered ordnance equipment will be evacuated to ordnance collecting points.
  (5) When not actually required for recovery operations, the recovery company may be required to assist ordnance depot companies and heavy maintenance companies in displacing forward by transporting some of their heavy assemblies. Tank transporters will normally haul heavy supplies and all orders dispatching transporters over the road should include instructions relative to loads to be hauled.
 
Ord Recovery units in USAREUR (STATION LIST, 15 Dec 1952):
460th Ord Co (Recovery), Sandhofen

 
Ordnance Reclamation and Classification Company (T/O&E 9-167)

a. Mission.
The ordnance reclamation and classification company operates ordnance collecting points in the combat zone.

b. Assignment.
Ordnance reclamation and classification companies are attached to ordnance battalion headquarters to operate ordnance collecting points near the corps rear boundary or in the army service area.

c. Capabilities.
The ordnance reclamation and classification company is a semi-mobile unit capable of operating a collecting point for the receipt, inspection, classification, and segregation of unserviceable ordnance general supplies and similar captured enemy materiel, normally generated by a corps in combat. It performs minor repairs to ordnance general supplies, including the sectional repair of tires and tubes, preserves and prepares items of ordnance general supply for evacuation when major repairs are required, and disposes of the unserviceable residue.

d. Organization. The ordnance reclamation and classification company consists of a reclamation and classification platoon and a supply and evacuation platoon.
  (1) The reclamation and classification platoon consists of armament and automotive repairmen and tire rebuilders.
  (2) The supply and evacuation platoon consists of supply specialists to record, pack, and ship all serviceable or reclaimed items to designated ordnance general supply installations, and to preserve and package unserviceable but repairable items for shipment to designated field and depot maintenance installations; and special vehicle operators to move heavy ordnance equipment within the ordnance collecting points.
 
e. Operations.
Operating procedures of the ordnance reclamation and classification company will provide for
  (1) Classification and segregation of materiel received at the ordnance collecting point in accordance with the supply categories previously outlined in Chapter 1 of FM 9-10. Materiel classified as belonging to unserviceable group C is further segregated as follows
 
(a) Economically repairable with minimum effort and within capabilities of the classification and reclamation company.
(b) Repairable by supporting heavy maintenance companies.
(c) Repairable by depot maintenance units of the communication zone.
  (2) Preservation and preparation of materiel for evacuation to designated ordnance general supply or maintenance installations in accordance with priorities established by higher headquarters.
  (3) Minor repair of the maximum amount of unserviceable equipment, accessories, and spare parts consistent with the primary mission of classifying and evacuating materiel to other maintenance installations to insure that the backlog of unclassified materiel does not assume unwarranted proportions.
  (4) Repair and return to stock of tires and tubes requiring single section repairs and evacuation to tire repair companies of the communications zone those tires requiring retreading or multiple section repairs.
 
Ord R&C units in USAREUR (STATION LIST, 15 Dec 1952):
148th Ord Co (R&C)(Army), Griesheim

 
Ordnance Artillery and Vehicle Park Company (T/O&E 9-137)

a. Mission.
The ordnance artillery and vehicle park company receives, stores, and distributes the army utility stock of reserve towed artillery and vehicles. The company operates a small ammunition supply point and ration dump for the loading of ammunition and rations on combat vehicles before issuing them.

b. Assignment.
Ordnance artillery and vehicle park companies are attached to ordnance battalion headquarters on the basis of the quantity of towed artillery and vehicles expected to be maintained as army reserve stocks in the combat zone. Normally, only one company is required per army or independent corps.

c. Capabilities.
  (1) The ordnance artillery and vehicle park company is capable of maintaining a reserve of 100 artillery pieces (including self-propelled) and approximately 1,000 vehicles, of which 40 per cent are expected to be combat vehicles. In each 30-day period, the unit is capable of receiving and distributing approximately twice this quantity of ordnance equipment.
  (2) In processing artillery and vehicles for issue and in performing care and preservation in storage on this ordnance equipment, the company must be assisted by ordnance field maintenance companies. Normally, an ordnance battalion, consisting of a battalion headquarters, an artillery and vehicle park company, and one or more ordnance medium maintenance and medium automotive maintenance companies, is charged with the operation of the artillery and vehicle park for an army in the field.
 
d. Organization.
The artillery and vehicle park company consists of a park platoon and a distribution platoon.
  (1) The park platoon includes the inspection and maintenance section and the depot section. The inspection and maintenance section includes the specialists required to perform care and preservation in storage on items of ordnance equipment which have been processed by the field maintenance companies. The depot section includes the supply specialists and ammunition handlers to maintain property accountability for major items received and issued, to maintain a stockage of tools and accessories to replace items found to be missing; and to maintain stocks of rations, ammunition, and gasoline for use in combat loading vehicles.
  (2) The distribution platoon includes the personnel and equipment to deliver artillery and vehicles within the combat zone.
 
e. Operations.
  (1) The artillery and vehicle park company functions as a single "port of entry" into the army area for artillery and vehicles. Artillery and vehicles received from the communications zone will be receipted for and picked up on the stock record cards of the artillery and vehicle park company. Prior to placing major items in storage, all items are inspected and a work request and job order is prepared on materiel which is not in serviceable group A or B condition. The supporting ordnance maintenance companies are responsible for performing the maintenance required to place the major items in serviceable group A or B condition.
  (2) Provisions will be made for performing care and preservation in storage on major items and for evacuating items developing deficiencies beyond the capabilities of the artillery and vehicle park company to supporting ordnance maintenance companies.
  (3) The artillery and vehicle park company will maintain a stock of tools and accessories for replacement of any found missing on major items received. Stocks of rations, ammunition, and gasoline for combat loading vehicles will also be maintained.
  (4) Normally, replacement vehicles and artillery will be delivered to ordnance maintenance units or to designated using units. However, delivery may be taken at the artillery and vehicle park if directed by higher authority. Tank transporters and other transportation evacuating unserviceable materiel to the rear should be utilized to effect delivery to forward units whenever possible.
 
Ord Arty & Veh Park units in USAREUR (STATION LIST, 15 Dec 1952):
558th Ord Co (Arty-Veh Park), 19th Ord Bn, Böblingen

 
(Source: Keeping the Guns Battle-Ready, Army Information Digest, Jan 1956. p. 41 - 43.)
Each infantry and airborne division normally has an Ordnance battalion consisting of two (2) companies, while the armored division Ordnance battalion is composed of three identical companies, plus a headquarters company.

Normally Ordnance companies work in the Division rear and Corps service areas but are assigned to Army.
- Direct Support (DS) Ordnance companies give mobile support for non-divisional troops and reinforce division ordnance when required.
- Backing up the DS companies at Corps level are Ordnance Heavy Maintenance (HM) companies (TOE 9-9R) which furnish repairs too heavy for the DS companies.
- There are also Direct Support companies in the Army Area to supply and maintain the Army AAA Brigade.

Depot maintenance is centered in the Communications Zone Area.

Materiel that may be too badly damaged for either DS or HM units to handle is dispatched to the Ordnance Armament and Fire Control Rebuild Company of the Ordnance Armament Rebuild Battalion.

In addition there are several Ordnance detachments and teams which are organized for specific duties.
- Artillery Repair Detachments for field artillery repairs
- Integrated Fire Control Detachments which provide field maintenace of the M-33 Antiaircraft Fire Control Systems or T-38 Antiaircraft Fire Control Systems
- Heavy Antiaircraft Artillery Repair Detachment which performs field maintenance on 75-mm, 90-mm and 120-mm pieces and mounts only.

 
EUCOM Ordnance Division -- Ordnance Construction Program (1950 - 1953)
 

USAREUR Construction Program, 1950-1953

EUCOM Ordnance Division

With the initiation of the troop augmentation program in 1950, USAREUR launched a construction program in Germany to provide housing and support facilities for the planned increase of US Army troops in theater from 86,000 to over 230,000. April 1950 a

This section covers the construction efforts undertaken to support Ordnance Corps troops in Germany.

EUCOM Ordnance Division (1952) -- Ordnance Rebuild Program
 
1952
(Source: STARS & STRIPES, March 2, 1952)
EUCOM Chief of Ordnance in 1952 is Brig Gen Ray M. Hare

Currently, one of the primary mission's of the Ordnance Division is the rebuilding of WWII-vintage ordnance materiel for equipping the armies of Allies under the Mutual Defense Assistance Program. In additional to the rebuild program, the Ord Div is also responsible for training (in the EUCOM Ordnance School) officers and men of the MDAP nations in the maintenance of the equipment that they are receiving through the rebuild program.

The Rebuild Program began in May 1947 when the Ordnance Division was tasked with collect and rehabilitate equipment that had been left in theater when units redeployed to the US after WWII. This surplus equipment was scattered around Germany in depots and vehicle parks. The Ord Div began actual rebuilding operations in 1948. Equipment declared excess of Army needs were channeled through STEG (1) for disposal.

This program is still active and continues to supply rebuilt equipment to both US troops as well as to allied nations under MDAP.

So far (March 1952), the program has rebuilt approximately $1 billion worth of equipment that includes wheeled and tracked vehicles (jeeps, trucks and tanks), artillery, small arms, automatic weapons, tires and tubes, fire-control apparatus, tools and parts. The cost to US taxpayers was less than $100 million. (Returning the equipment to the US for rebuild and then resupply back to the European theater would have cost about $600 million).

Due to the added missions of supporting the MDAP program and the build up of US troops in theater, the Ordnance Division has undergone a major reorganization in the recent past. Four ordnance groups have been formed under the Ord Div to handle the increased load and to maintain operational control of the 20+ ordnance installations in theater:

  7848th Ordnance Maintenance Group   Hqs: Esslingen
CO: Col James E. McInerney
operates 13 maintenance shops
  7847th Ordnance Supply Group   Hqs: Mannheim
CO: Lt Col Frederic E. Hendler
operates 4 supply depots
  7846th Ordnance Ammunition Group   Hqs: Kaiserslautern
CO: Lt Col Samuel M. Fletcher
operates 5 ammunition depots
  7841st Ordnance Procurement Group   Hqs: Sandhofen
CO: Col James W. Walters
operates branch offices located in varies European cities
 
Ordnance Installations in Germany include:

  Butzbach Ordnance Depot    
  Karlsfeld Ordnance Depot    
  Mannheim Ordnance Depot    
  Ordnance Stock Control Center   (Mannheim)
  Ober-Ramstadt Tire Rebuild Shop    
  Pirmasens Ordnance Depot    
  EUCOM Ordnance School   Eschwege
  Rhine Ammunition Depot   Miesau
  Rhine Ordnance Depot   Kaiserslautern
  Germersheim Ordnance Vehicle Park    
  Mainz Ordnance Depot    
  Ordnance Automotive Center   includes the following rebuild shops:
Esslingen Ordnance Depot
Bad Cannstatt Vehicle Park
Aalen Ordnance Depot
Böblingen Ordnance Rebuild Shop
Schwäbisch-Gmünd Ordnance Rebuild Shop
Waiblingen Ordnance Rebuild Shop
Of note, more than 24,000 Germans are employed by the ordnance depots in Germany.
 
Ordnance Installations in France include:

  Captieux Ammunition Depot    
  Trois-Fontaines Ammunition Depot    
  Braconne Ordnance Depot    
  Fontenet Ordnance Depot    
  Nancy Ordnance Depot    
  Frescaty Aircraft Service Center    
  St. Hubert Ordnance ??    
 
(1) STEG (Staatliche Erfassungsstelle für öffentliches Gut) is the West German government-controlled agency responsible for the disposal of surplus equipment.

 
(Source: STARS & STRIPES, Dec 8, 1953)
USAREUR Ord Div announced on December 7 that ten ordnance installations have been renamed. Under the new naming system, ordnance installations are classified as either supply or maintenance. Maintenance installations are further broken down as to the type of maintenance performed. (All other ordnance installations remain unchanged.)

The installations renamed are as follows:
  NEW DESIGNATION HIGHER HQS  
  Esslingen Ord Maintenance Depot (Auto) 51st Ord Gp  
  Boeblingen Ord Maintenance Depot (Auto) 51st Ord Gp  
  Schwaebisch-Gmuend Maintenance Depot (Auto) 51st Ord Gp  
  Karlsfeld Ord Maintenance Depot (Auto) 51st Ord Gp  
  Aalen Ord Maintenance Depot (Auto) 51st Ord Gp  
  Butzbach Ord Maintenance Depot (Armament) 51st Ord Gp  
  Mainz Ord Maintenance Depot (Armament & Fire Control) 51st Ord Gp  
  Pirmasens Ord Supply Depot 53rd Ord Gp  
  Rhine Ord Supply Depot 53rd Ord Gp  
  Mannheim Ord Supply Depot 53rd Ord Gp  

(Source: STARS & STRIPES, May 14, 1953)
USAREUR Ordnance 1952/53
On the occasion of the Army Ordnance Corps' 141st Anniversary observance at Spinelli Barracks, Mannheim, Brig Gen Earl S. Gruver, ordnance officer of USAREUR, will inspect the honor guard and then witness a display of ordnance materiel required to supply an infantry regiment, including weapons, ammunition, wheeled and tracked vehicles, tools and fire control instruments.

Guests for the day's activities will include, in addition to Gruver, Col George W. White, deputy ordnance officer for USAREUR, and Lt Col F. E. Hendler, commanding officer of the 53rd Ord Gp.

A parade and review of troops in honor of Gruver will follow the demonstration.

To train manpower in Europe for the technical role of Ordnance is the mission of the USAREUR Ordnance School at Fuessen. Here, both officers and enlisted men as well as personnel of countries taking part in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the Mutual Security Administration program receive instruction in subjects ranging from special parts identification to maintenance of the M47 tank.

Another ordnance unit, the 51st Ord Gp, commanded by Col Philip Schwartz, can well be called the Army arsenal in Europe. Into the depots and installations of this group are funneled all the worn and disabled guns, instruments, fire control equipment, wheeled and tracked vehicles and tires.

After being rebuilt and reconditioned, this equipment is put back in use with US forces and NATO nations.

The 53rd Ord Gp processed for shipment more than 100,000 wheeled and tracked vehicles during the past year. The group is located at the Germersheim Ordnance Vehicle Park and the Rhine Ordnance Depot. The Germersheim park was established for vehicle processing in connection with the Mutual Defense Assistance Program.

The ordnance offshore procurement program, administered by the Ordnance Procurement Center under the command of Col Joseph M. Colby, is another of Gruver's responsibilies.

1954
(Source: STARS & STRIPES, May 11, 1954)

Reduction of the Army Rebuild Program

The Army's vehicle rebuild program in Europe which was originally initiated to rehabilitate WWII-era vehicles and equipment is now drawing to a close. Two current trends have reduced the need for many of the depots involved in the program:
1) the last of the WWII-era vehicles and equipment that the US had committed to deliver to its NATO allies under the MDAP program is now rolling off depot assembly lines;
2) most of the rebuild work in the future will be performed by civilian firms under commercial contracts.

By the end of this summer, more than half of the USAREUR ordnance rebuild installations which existed in 1951 will have been closed and turned back to their former German owners.

The Mutual Defense Assistance Program placed a great workload on the USAREUR Ordnance Division. Under MDAP, the division was responsible for rebuilding, processing, and shipping more than 50,000 vehicles and tons of supplies to NATO allies. In the meantime, almost all of the WWII-era rebuilt vehicles have been replaced by newly developed (post-WWII) vehicles.

In September 1951, 14 rebuild shops operated under the 7848th Ord Maint Gp which later became the 51st Ord Gp. Only four of these are scheduled to still be in operation by the end of next year.

Some of the more important shops closed before May 1954 (closed date in parentheses):
Bad Cannstatt Ord Vehicle Park (Oct 1952)
Waiblingen Ord Rebuild Shop (June 1953)
Aalen Ord Maint Depot (Feb 1954)

Esslingen Ord Maint Depot was reduced to a sub-branch of the Boeblingen Depot (Feb 1954)

Scheduled shutdowns for the near future (scheduled close date in parentheses):
Butzbach Ord Maint Depot (May 1954)
Pirmasens Ord Supply Depot (May 1954)
Rhine Ord Supply Depot (June 1954)
Karlsfeld Ord Maint Depot (1955)

The four remaining rebuild depots will be located at:
Schwaebisch Gmuend
Ober-Ramstadt
Boeblingen
Mainz

The Mainz and Boeblingen Depots will become the center of rebuild activity for USAREUR, USAFE and USFA.

In addition, there will be two ordnance supply depots in Germany:
Mannheim
Germersheim

Supply operations are being centered in the Com Z.


EUCOM Ordnance Division (1956)
 
(Source: Telephone Directory, USAREUR Ordnance Division, March 1956)

Telephone Directory
USAREUR Ordnance Division

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Page 8

Page 9
Page 10
Page 11


Webmaster Note: list of Ordnance Installations in COMZ is not included -- was to be published at a later date as a supplement to this directory.

 
Ordnance Maintenance & Supply units in USAREUR (1)
(Source: Telephone Directory, USAREUR Ordnance Division, March 1956)
47th ORD GP ORGANIZATION (March 1956):

UNIT DESIGNATION

DUTY STATION COMMENTS
HHC, 47th Ord Gp (M&S) Ludwigsburg APO 154
8th Ord Bn (M&S) Hanau APO 165
33rd Ord Co (R&C) Oberursel  
88th Ord Co (HM) Hanau  
507th Ord Co (HAM) Hanau  
881st Ord Co (HAM) Hanau  
71st Ord Bn (M&S) Dachau (Munich) APO 108
6th Ord Co (DS) Crailsheim  
8th Ord Co (DS) Munich  
22nd Ord Co (DS) Illesheim  
350th Ord Ball & Tech Svc Det Illesheim  
556th Ord Co (DS) Zirndorf  
569th Ord Co (DAS) Ludwigsburg  
8902nd LS Co (DAS) Esslingen  
Det #1, 569th Ord Co Böblingen  
85th Ord Bn (M&S) Oberursel APO 757
10th Ord Co (DS) Giessen  
15th Ord Co (DAS) Fulda  
42nd Ord Co (DAS) Oberursel  
537th Ord Co (DS) Schweinfurt  
557th Ord Co (DS) Aschaffenburg  
138th Ord Co (GMDS) Kitzingen in support of CPL battalion
87th Ord Bn (M&S) Nellingen APO 46
124th Ord Co (HM) Nellingen  
521st Ord Co (HAM) Nellingen  
585th Ord Co (R&C) Sandhofen  
903rd Ord Co (HAM) Nellingen  
     
 
51st ORD GP ORGANIZATION (March 1956):

UNIT DESIGNATION

DUTY STATION COMMENTS
HHC, 51st Ord Gp (M&S) Sandhofen APO 28
19th Ord Bn (M&S) Sandhofen APO 28
40th Ord Co (FS) Sandhofen  
63rd Ord Co (FS) Sandhofen  
77th Ord Co (HAM) Esslingen  
78th Ord Co (FS) Mannheim  
182nd Ord Co (FS) Sandhofen  
334th Ord Co (FS) Illesheim  
8900th LS Co (FS) Mannheim  
66th Ord Bn (M&S) Ettlingen APO 164; 66th Ord Bn (M&S) just recently replaced the 80th Ord Bn (M&S) under Operation GYROSCOPE.
14th Ord Co (DS) Wiesbaden  
18th Ord Co (DS) Karlsruhe  
96th Ord Co (GMDS) Mainz in support of CPL battalion
531st Ord Co (DS) Mannheim  
150th IFCR Det (M33) Wiesbaden  
151st IFCR Det (M33) Mannheim  
183rd IFCR Det (T38) Wiesbaden  
223rd IFCR Det (T38) Wiesbaden  
370th IFCR Det (T38) Mannheim  
371st IFCR Det (T38) Wiesbaden  
81st Ord Bn (M&S) Kaiserslautern APO 227
48th Ord Co (DS) Baumholder  
517th Ord Co (HM) Kaiserslautern  
546th Ord Co (DAS) Kaiserslautern  
558th Ord Co (A&VP) Kaiserslautern  
152nd IFCR Det (M33) Kaiserslautern  
169th IFCR Det (T38) Kaiserslautern  
8901st LS Co (DAS) Kaiserslautern  
     
(1) Does not include ordnance units in COMZEUR; ordnance ammunition units are listed below.

 
FIELD ARMY LEVEL ORDNANCE UNITS - 1950s

8th Ord Bn

19th Ord Bn

38th Ord Bn

71st Ord Bn

80th Ord Bn

81st Ord Bn

85th Ord Bn

87th Ord Bn

 
Ordnance - Ammunition Supply
 
(Source: Telephone Directory, USAREUR Ordnance Division, March 1956)
57th ORD GP (AMMO) ORGANIZATION (March 1956):

UNIT DESIGNATION

DUTY STATION COMMENTS
HHC, 57th Ord Gp (Ammo) Kaiserslautern APO 227
82nd Ord Bn (Ammo) Miesau APO 180
50th Ord Co (Ammo) Miesau  
46th LS Dist Miesau  
7418th LS Co (Ammo) Miesau  
8903rd LS Renovation Pltn Miesau  
84th Ord Bn (Ammo) Ettlingen APO 227
606th Ord Co (Ammo) Baumholder  
663rd Ord Co (Ammo) Vilseck  
2nd EOD Squad Grafenwoehr  
3rd EOD Squad Hohenfels  
20th EOD Squad Miesau  
48th LS Dist (Ammo) Kaiserslautern  
2040th L Co (Ammo) Kaiserslautern  
2041st L Co (Ammo) Kaiserslautern  
     
 
71st ORD GP (M&S) ORGANIZATION (March 1956):

UNIT DESIGNATION

DUTY STATION COMMENTS
HHC, 71st Ord Gp (Ammo) Pirmasens APO 289
9th Ord Bn (Sp Wpns Spt) Neckarsulm APO 176
15th Ord Bn (Sp Wpns Spt) Weierhof (Kirchheimbolanden) APO 227
     

 
Ordnance Procurement Center

See some history of present day Mannheim Laboratory Center

Ordnance - 7th Army Modern Army Supply System (MASS) Project
 
For some of the information on the role of the Ordnance Technical Service in the 7th Army MASS project, see the relevant section on the 19th Ord Bn Page.
 
(More MASS Project information to be added)
 

 
The 1960s
 
Class V Ordnance Service in the European Theater
 
(Source: History of the 15th Ordnance Battalion, Adjutant, HQ 15th Ord Bn, 1980s)
In 1961, a realignment of ordnance support units in Germany, including ammunition units, was effected. Previously, the three Class V ordnance battalions were grouped under 57th Ord Gp (Ammo). In November, the 15th Ord Bn was relieved from attachment to the 57th and attached to the 51st Ord Gp. Similarily, the 101st Ord Bn was relieved (probably in the same time frame) from the 57th and attached to the 47th Ord Gp. The 84th Ord Bn remained attached to the 57th Ord Gp.

At the same time, the mission of the Class V ordnance battalions changed and they became "composite organizations" consisting of conventional and special ammunition companies, as well as supply and maintenance companies.

The 15th Ord Bn unit history goes on to say that the battalion's "composite organization" was soon changed back to a purely ammunition organization (probably in 1963). This is probably true for the other ammo battalions. The battalions, however, remained attached to the "composite" ordnance groups until 1965, when the COSTAR concept was implemented.
 
(Source: STATION LIST, 30 September 1963)
CLASS V SUPPORT (COMPANY SIZE)
TITLE
TOE
UNIT
COMD
LOCATION
Company, Ammunition
9-17D
50th Ord Co (Ammo)
76
Rhine Ord Bks, Kaiserslautern
144th Ord Co (Ammo)
76
Ray Bks, Friedberg
184th Ord Co (Ammo)
76
Kelly Bks, Darmstadt
501st Ord Co (Ammo)
76
Rheinland Ksn, Ettlingen
535th Ord Co (Ammo)
76
D'Isly Ksn, Pirmasens
571st Ord Co (Ammo)
76
North Point Depot, Kriegsfeld
663rd Ord Co (Ammo)
76
Rose Bks, Vilseck
664th Ord Co (Ammo)
76
Strassbourg Ksn, Idar Oberstein
Company, SW & MSL, DS
9-47D
23rd Ord Co
76
Badnerhof Ksn, Heilbronn
28th Ord Co
76
Turenne Ksn, Zweibrücken
Co A, 328th Ord Bn
34
Caserma Ederle, Vicenza
545th Ord Co
76
Ord Ammo Depot, Münster
Company, SW & MSL, GS
9-87D
27th Ord Co (Sp Ammo)(GS)
03
Büren
70th Ord Co (Sp Ammo)(GS)
03
Corlu, Turkey
138th Ord Co (Sp Ammo)(GS)
03
Elevsis, Greece
162nd Ord Co (Sp Ammo)(GS)
03
Lüdenscheid
510th Ord Co (Sp Ammo)(GS)
03
Urlau
Company, SW & MSL, Dep
9-377D
9th Ord Co
46
Miesau
64th Ord Co
46
Fischbach
69th Ord Co (Sp Ammo)(Dep)
34
Caserma Ederle, Vicenza
525th Ord Co
46
Ord Area, Siegelbach
529th Ord Co
46
Massweiler
583rd Ord Co
46
Dahn
619th Ord Co
46
North Point Depot, Kriegsfeld
CLASS V COMMAND UNITS
TITLE
TOE
UNIT
COMD
LOCATION
Group, Ammo, HHC
9-22D
HHD, 57th Ord Gp (Ammo)
76
Rhine Ord Bks, Kaiserslautern
HHC, 59th Ord Gp (Ammo)
46
D'Isly Ksn, Pirmasens
Battalion, Ammo, HHD
9-86D
HHD, 15th Ord Bn (Ammo)
76
Gutleut Ksn, Frankfurt
HHD, 72nd Ord Bn (Ammo)
46
Rhine Ord Bks, Kaiserslautern
HHD, 84th Ord Bn (Ammo)
76
Rhine Ord Bks, Kaiserslautern
HHD, 101st Ord Bn (Ammo)
76
Badnerhof Ksn, Heilbronn
HHD, 193rd Ord Bn (Ammo)
46
Neureut Ksn, Karlsruhe

COMMAND CODES

 
03
Special Ammunition Support Command, USAREUR
 
34
Southern European Task Force
 
46
4th Logistical Command (COMZ)
 
76
Seventh Army Support Command
 

Figure 1: Class V Ordnance Service (1959)
Source: FM 9-1, Ordnance Service in the Field, June 1959

 
(Source: Email from Rick Anders, Germany)
As already mentioned on different pages of this web site, Rick is doing research on various topics relating to French units stationed in Germany. His investigations have led him to many different governmental archives in France and Germany. As a courtesy, he has provided to this web site many tidbits of information that pertain to the US Army in Germany that he finds as part of his efforts.
 
Found something about the 47th Ord Gp you might be interested in. The following information is from 1962.

The 47th Ord Gp at Stuttgart has responsibility for 13 ammunition storage sites in Baden-Württemberg and eight in Bavaria (including Bamberg). Those in B-W are at:
 
LOCATION
OPERATING UNIT
COMD
DESIGNATION/SITE
 
Wertheim
.
at Grünewörth, west of the airfield; PSP 6J
 
Böblingen
.
PSP 25
 
Schwäbisch Hall
.
(possibly PSP 26) (MUNA Kupfer at Geilenkirchen?)
Bad Mergentheim
.
PSP 27J
Schwäbisch-Gmünd
.
at Waldstetten (possibly PSP 28)
Ellwangen
.
at Wört
Lampertheim
.
 
Merklingen
.
(possibly PSP 81)
Crailsheim
.
(possibly PSP 82)
Bruchsal
.
at Kammerforst; RASP 971
Friedrichstal
.
at Hochstetten
Siegelsbach
.
 
Hockenheim
.
at the time this storage site did not conform to NATO regulations and was recommended for closure by the 47th
         
 
The 51st Ord Gp at Mannheim had eight or nine sites in Hesse.
 
The 57th Ord Gp at Kaiserslautern had five sites in Rhineland-Palatinate and the Saarland.
 
Webmaster Note: Will work on getting the 51st and 57th sites identified and creating a list for each of the Ord Groups.
Will also work on identifying which sites were being operated by which ordnance ammo companies in the 1960s (see list above). Will be happy to receive help from anybody who might know some of these details.

MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION:
Miesau Depot Activity ABREST
Pirmasens Depot Activity ABREST
PSP Koeppern (German:
Munitionsdepot Wehrheim-Rosbach)  became operational in 1952 and was handed over to the Bundeswehr in 1997
PSP Bernbach (German: Munitionsdepot Freigericht-Bernbach)

 
Ordnance - Special Weapons Support
 
Nuclear-capable artillery in NATO - 1965
 
(Source: German Bundesarchiv, via Rick Anders)
SW Storage Sites in Germany
.
 
(Sources: NATO Strategy Documents, 1949-1969, Historical Office, SHAPE, 1997; Die Anfangsjahre des Heeres, 1956-1966, Special Issue #5002, Tankograd Militärfahrzeug, 2003; War Without Battles, Canada's NATO Brigade in Germany, 1951-1993, by Sean M. Maloney, 1997)
SHIELD AND SWORD

In 1958, a plan - called MC 70 - was developed by NATO to restructure forces committed to ACE, based on the 1957 strategic concept (MC 14/2). The plan entailed integrating nuclear delivery systems into the "Shield" forces (1), thus making available to NATO members a range of nuclear-capable tube artillery (M-110), short range and medium range surface-to-surface missiles (HJ; Sergeant; Corporal) and nuclear-tiped anti-aircaft missiles (NIKE-H).

A result of this was the creation in 1958 of a stockpile of US nuclear warheads available to NATO members who at the same time acquired the appropriate delivery systems. The American-owned weapons could only be released on the order of SACEUR.
 
NATO Strategy Documents

Militärfahrzeug Special
Issue #5002

War Without Battles cover
  MC 70 FORCE STRUCTURE

NORTHAG
I (NE) Corps


I (GE) Corps
By the end of 1959, the German corps and divisions had been reorganized under Heeresstruktur 2 ("Division 59"). The artillery at corps and division levels were equipped with the modern M-110 203mm SP howitzers (dual-capable), the non-nuclear M-107 175mm SP howitzers and the Honest John rockets.

Each corps artillery command (ArtKdo) included an HJ-equipped rocket artillery battalion (RakArtBtl) (1) and a field artillery battalion (FArtBtl) (2). The HJ units would later be transferred to divisional artillery regiments, once the new Sergeant missile system was available. By 1964, three Sergeant missile battalions had been formed under the three artillery commands (2).

Each divisional artillery regiment included a field artillery battalion (two 175mm batteries, one 203mm battery) and a rocket artillery battalion (three HJ batteries).

(1) RakArtBtl 140 at Nienburg; RakArtBtl 240 at Ingolstadt; RakArtBtl 340 at Gießen.
(2) Each FArtBtl comprised two medium (175mm) and one heavy (203mm) firing battery.
(3) RakArtBtl 150 at Wesel; RakArtBtl 250 at Großengstingen; RakArtBtl 350 at Montabaur. A fourth missile battalion, RakArtBtl 650, was formed at Flensburg and assigned as an asset of the LANDJUT Corps in Schleswig Holstein.


I (BR) Corps

I (BR) Corps nuclear assets by 1960 included three artillery regiments (24 Missile Regiment, RA, Assaye Bks, Nienburg (4); 39 Missile Regiment, RA, Dempsey Barracks, Sennelager; and 50 Missile Regiment, RA, Northumberland Barracks, Menden) each comprised of two HJ batteries and two 8in howitzer batteries. Two batteries of 8in guns were allocated to each of the British divisions in I Corps, while the HJ rockets were held at Corps level.

In addition to the afore-mentioned Missile Regiments, I Corps also had a Guided Weapons regiment, 47 Regiment, consisting of two firing batteries equipped with the Corporal missile (one launcher to each battery). This unit was located at Napier Barracks, Dortmund. Two Corporal launchers were held at Army Group (NORTHAG) level.

In 1961, a second Guided Weapons regiment (24 Regiment) was added to the Corps Artillery assets. Arriving from the UK, this unit was also stationed at Napier Barracks.

(4) The regiment moved to Barker Barracks, Paderborn, in 1962.

I (BE) Corps




Ordnance - TOEs activated or reorganized under the COSTAR Concept
 
(Source: FM 101-10-2 Extracts of Tables of Organization and Equipment, January 1965 with Change 1)
Click on thumbnails to view additional details on particular TOE's
 
(STATION LIST, 30 September 1966)

TOE 29-134F / Light Equipment GS Maintenance Company
78th Lt Equip GS Mnt Company, Panzer Ksn, Boeblingen
81st Lt Equip GS Mnt Company, Sullivan Bks, Mannheim
91st Lt Equip GS Mnt Company, Pulaski Bks, Kaiserslautern
182nd Lt Equip GS Mnt Company, W.O. Darby Ksn, Fuerth
881st Lt Equip GS Mnt Company, Hessen-Homburg Ksn, Hanau

TOE 29-137F / Heavy Equipment GS Maintenance Company
42nd Hvy Equip GS Mnt Company, W.O. Darby Ksn, Fuerth
43rd Hvy Equip GS Mnt Company, Daenner Ksn, Kaiserslautern
66th Hvy Equip GS Mnt Company, Harvey Bks, Kitzingen
77th Hvy Equip GS Mnt Company, Gerszewski Bks, Knielingen

88th Hvy Equip GS Mnt Company, Pioneer Ksn, Hanau
124th Hvy Equip GS Mnt Company, Nellingen
507th Hvy Equip GS Mnt Company, Grossauheim Ksn, Hanau

517th Hvy Equip GS Mnt Company, Tompkins Bks, Schwetzingen
543rd Hvy Equip GS Mnt Company, Pioneer Ksn, Hanau
572nd Hvy Equip GS Mnt Company, Wharton Bks, Heilbronn
903rd Hvy Equip GS Mnt Company, Nellingen

TOE 29-139F / Collection, Classification and Salvage Company
296th Col Cls-Salv Company, Hutier Ksn, Hanau - read more
508th Col Cls-Salv Company, Pulaski Bks, Kaiserslautern
538th Col Cls-Salv Company, Nellingen - read more

TOE 29-136F / Maintenance GS Battalion -
Hq & Hq Det, 8th Maint Bn (GS), Grossauheim Ksn, Hanau
- read more
Hq & Hq Det, 81st Maint Bn (GS), Taylor Bks, Mannheim
- read more
Hq & Hq Det, 87th Maint Bn (GS), Nellingen Ksn, Nellingen
- read more

TOE 29-205F / Maintenance DS Battalion
-
Hq & A Co (Main Spt), 1st Maint Bn (DS), Ludendorff Ksn, Kornwestheim
- read more
B Co (Lt Maint), 1st Maint Bn, Eastman Bks, Dachau
C Co (Lt Maint), 1st Maint Bn, Artillery Ksn, Neckarsulm
D Co (Lt Maint), 1st Maint Bn, Flak Ksn, Ludwigsburg
Hq & A Co (Main Spt), 19th Maint Bn (DS), Pendleton Bks, Giessen - read more
B Co (Lt Maint), 19th Maint Bn, Camp Pieri, Wiesbaden
C Co (Lt Maint), 19th Maint Bn, Downs Bks, Fulda
Hq & A Co (Main Spt), 51st Maint Bn (DS), Sullivan Bks, Mannheim - read more
B Co (Lt Maint), 51st Maint Bn, Gerszewski Bks, Knielingen
C Co (Lt Maint), 51st Maint Bn, Spinelli Bks, Mannheim
Hq & A Co (Main Spt), 66th Maint Bn (DS), Rhein Ord Bks, Kaiserslautern
- read more
B Co (Lt Maint), 66th Maint Bn, Rhein Ord Bks, Kaiserslautern
C Co (Lt Maint), 66th Maint Bn, Smith Bks, Baumholder
Hq & A Co (Main Spt), 71st Maint Bn (DS), Pinder Ksn, Zirndorf
- read more
B Co (Lt Maint), 71st Maint Bn, Conn Bks, Schweinfurt
C Co (Lt Maint), 71st Maint Bn, Ammo Depot, Bamberg
Hq & A Co (Main Spt), 85th Maint Bn (DS), Pioneer Ksn, Hanau
- read more
B Co (Lt Maint), 85th Maint Bn, Pioneer Ksn, Hanau
C Co (Lt Maint), 85th Maint Bn, Fiori Bks, Aschaffenburg

Please contact meif you have additions, corrections or details on any of these units.

 
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